In the aftermath of an affair, young married couple, Kevin and Natalie Dadich decide to make a fresh start by moving into a new home. The house is modern, spacious, and beautiful, but it comes with one catch – the previous owner was murdered in the living room.

The couple overlook the dark past of the house, in order to bag themselves a real estate bargain. They then promptly move their belongings into the property and look forward to a much brighter future.

But during the first night in the house, Natalie becomes convinced that a stranger is in the bathroom, even though no one appears to be there. Odd occurrences then take place over the next few days, suggesting the couple are not alone in the house.

Is Natalie imagining things or is there really an uninvited guest in their new abode? And if so, what does this unseen terror want?

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Aftermath is a brand-new thriller from director Peter Winther. The movie – inspired by true events – is new to Netflix from today, and stars Ashley Greene, Shawn Ashmore, and Ross McCall.

Part invasion chiller, part domestic drama, Aftermath is a low budget picture designed to intrigue, and unsettle. A great deal of the movie takes place at night, and the film employs jump scares and instantly recognisable horror tropes to create tension.

But unfortunately, despite its best efforts, Aftermath is neither scary nor tense, and isn’t particularly engrossing either. All attempts at bringing anything unnerving to the screen fall flat, and the suspense of the central mystery is all but non-existent.

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Aftermath feels very much like a run-of-the-mill television movie – it is competently put together, but it is all very formulaic, with Tab A being slotted into Tab B, and so on. The film brings nothing new to the genre, and is largely very bland.

The only part of the movie which is mildly interesting is the final 20 minutes, which sheds some light on the strange happenings in the house. However, to get to this section of the film, audiences are expected to sit through the previous 100 minutes without switching off, and that’s a lot to ask of anyone.

Image: ©Netflix
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If you are looking for a great thriller, then there are plenty out there, including recent(ish) pictures such as The Invisible Man (2020) or Run (2021), as well as classic suspense films including Rear Window (1954) – a movie that is briefly referenced in Aftermath. My advice? Go watch one of those movies instead, because you will have a much better time.

Aftermath never really goes anywhere and offers nothing you haven’t seen before. It is a misfire that is very forgettable and I expect will come and go, fading into the background on Netflix in the coming days.

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