Following a night out, Henry and Meera Parsons return home to find their house has been broken into and some of their belongings have been disturbed. Meera is understandably rattled by the incident, so Henry sets about installing a new security system, including an alarm, Apps, and a location tracker.

The following night, after going to bed, Meera wakes up to find the power has been knocked out. Henry goes outside to check the generator, only to discover cables have been deliberately cut and there are intruders in the house.

Rushing back inside, Henry finds Meera has been tied up and gagged. Henry frees his wife, grabs a gun that he has stashed in the house, and helps Meera escape out of the window.

In the moments that follow, shots are fired, with Henry killing two of the intruders and wounding another. The surviving intruder is taken to hospital and placed in the intensive care unit.

Over the coming days, Henry begins to act strange, leaving Meera to feel concerned about his unusual behaviour. Is he coming to terms with the terrible circumstances of the break in or is there something else going on?

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The above is the premise of Intrusion – a home invasion thriller from director Adam Salky. The movie stars Logan Marshall-Green, Freida Pinto, and Robert John Burke, and is available to stream on Netflix today.

Intrusion is a low-budget film, which plays very much like a TV movie of the week – something which is becoming quite common with many of Netflix’s recent releases (see Afterlife of the Party, Fear of Rain, Aftermath, etc). However, if small-scale thrillers are your thing, then you could certainly do a lot worse than what this movie has to offer.

Intrusion is not going to win any awards for originality, nor is it going to knock your socks off with style, let me be clear about this now, but it is a perfectly serviceable thriller which moves from A to B to C. It keeps things ticking along for the majority of its runtime, and at around 90 minutes it doesn’t outstay its welcome.

Image: ©Netflix
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In essence, Intrusion is nuts and bolts stuff. It’s a film, it tells a story, and it’s unlikely to make you shout and scream at your television set in absolute frustration.

I’m not telling you to rush to Netflix to watch it, but if you are flicking through the streaming service on a Sunday afternoon while nursing a hangover, and trying to find something to watch, you could easily let this play out. It won’t take you to new heights, but it’ll help pass the time.

Logan Marshall-Green and Freida Pinto do exactly what they need to in their roles, and there’s a mystery running through the film which is mildly intriguing. But this is what it is, so don’t expect anything spectacular.

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I know, I know, you came to this review expecting more, right? Yeah, I hear you, but Intrusion is not a film to get particularly emotive about.

If it was terrible, I would wax lyrical about its pitfalls and offer a (constructive) rant about how much I disliked it. If it was a fantastic film, then believe me, I’d be making this very clear too.

The best thing I can say is that it gets more interesting towards the final act, ensuring it doesn’t run out of steam at the eleventh hour. The worst things I can say is that it’s not very imaginative, some of the acting from the support cast is questionable, and in terms of the story, it’s all been done before.

Image: ©Netflix
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If you approach Intrusion as a direct-to-streaming, TV movie, it’s fine. Don’t expect A-class material, but if you look at this film as decent(ish) C-class content, you’ll not be too disappointed.

Of course, with so many streaming services and movies available, should you really be settling for C-class content? I’ll let you decide that one, and maybe take it up with Netflix who need to be trying a little harder right now.

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