In Bank of Dave, Dave Fishwick is an honest, decent businessman who is popular amongst the people of his home town of Burnley. The reason he is so well loved is due to his kindness and desire to invest in his local community.

Shortly after the recession in 2008, Dave began lending money to people who were in need of financial help. These were small loans, to those who had very little, but every single loan was paid back in full, every loan helped the borrowers move forward in their lives, and in the process 150 jobs were created.

Due to the success of these loans, Dave decides to set up his own bank, to continue helping the people of Burnley. But in order to do this, Dave has to enlist the aid of a legal team from London, including solicitor, Hugh Stockwell.

Working together, Dave and Hugh set about trying to get Dave’s idea off the ground. The problem is, the financial institutions that exist in the UK do not take kindly to a man from the North of England trying to set up a new bank, and they make attempts to scupper his progress.

Can Dave and Hugh work around the problems to bring the ‘Bank of Dave’ to life? Or will Dave’s dream remain forever out of reach?

Image: ©Netflix
Advertisements

Loosely based on a true story, Bank of Dave is a British comedy-drama, which stars Rory Kinnear, Joel Fry, Hugh Bonneville, Paul Kaye, Phoebe Dynevor, and Jo Hartley.  The movie – directed by Chris Foggin – details one man’s attempt to take on the establishment, and is new to Netflix from today.

Bank of Dave is a likeable, heartfelt, and inspiring picture, about people, community spirit, and the importance of pulling together. The film taps into a number of themes that are hot topics right now, including the elite’s mishandling of the economy, as well as the underfunding of the NHS, and it delivers a strong message of solidarity.

In addition to all this, Bank of Dave is a joy to watch. Sure, it’s not the greatest Brit flick of all-time, but it’s still ruddy good.

Similar to British movies such as The Full Monty, or Save the Cinema, Bank of Dave never loses sight of ordinary people and their power to make a positive change. It also acts as a reminder that with a few more Dave’s in the world (and specifically, the UK), maybe we wouldn’t be in the mess we’re all currently in.

Image: ©Netflix
Advertisements
Advertisements

Leading the movie is Rory Kinnear, who takes on the role of Dave, alongside Joel Fry as solicitor Hugh. These two put in great performances, becoming the heart and soul of the story, and they do a fine job of keeping everything ticking along nicely.

Joining Kinnear and Fry are a solid support cast which includes a fun turn from Paul Kaye as a semi-retired rock manager, as well as a short, but memorable part for Hugh Bonneville as a snooty toff, keen to see Dave’s bank stumble at the first hurdle. Neither of these actors get huge roles, but both nail their scenes perfectly.

In addition to the above, there is a bit of romance via Phoebe Dynevor’s character, Alexandra – a hard-working NHS doctor – and Jo Hartley brings warmth to Dave’s wife, Nicola. Oh, and to add to the mix, the film also boasts a cameo from a well-known rock band, which I won’t spoil here, but who get to add a touch of ‘star power’ to Dave’s campaign.

Image: ©Netflix
Advertisements

Thanks to an uplifting story, some solid performances, good direction, and a jukebox of songs that make up the film’s soundtrack, Bank of Dave is a lovely little movie. It is the sort of thing that is perfect for a Sunday afternoon in front of the TV, and it is likely to raise a smile or two.

Unless you happen to be an incredibly rich banker, or someone with a heart of stone, I can’t see this film offending anyone. It is enjoyable stuff, and one to watch when you need a light-hearted lift.

__

Thank you for taking the time to read this review on It’s A Stampede!. For more reviews, check out the recommended reads below.

Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements