In Norwegian black comedy, The Trip (aka I onde dager), a dysfunctional married couple head to a remote cabin in the woods in order to spend the weekend together. But while it might look as if the pair are up for some rest and relaxation, this is the furthest thing from their minds, as both have plans to bump each other off.    

However, the couple’s murderous intentions are soon abandoned when they encounter a significant stumbling block: Three escaped convicts have made their way to the cabin. If the couple thought they had problems before, they soon discover a whole lot more trouble as the convicts take over the cabin. But can the pair put aside their differences long enough to escape their new nightmare, or are they better off fending for themselves?

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Directed by Tommy Wirkola, The Trip stars Noomi Rapace and Aksel Hennie. The movie is available to stream on Netflix from today, and is a dark farce, ideal for those who like danger with their humour.

This is a movie about murder after all, so expect a significant amount of blood and a lot of violence. At times, this film moves into some very unsettling places, so don’t expect anything even remotely warm and fuzzy, but do expect sadistic slapstick, bad language, and the occasional rogue poo.  

Sound like something your depraved little mind can get on board? Well, if you said ‘yes’, then you are probably on a similar wave-length to me. I found The Trip to be a real hoot, and if any of the above has even remotely tickled your pickle, then I expect you will come to a similar conclusion. This is a movie for those who love the darker side of life, and who enjoy bonkers movies and blood splatter.

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The Trip takes a little while to find its funny bone, but once it gets into its groove, it steadily builds into something enjoyable. There are a few humorous lines to begin with, followed by some sight gags here and there, but once the movie gets into the second half of the picture everything starts getting chucked at the screen.

From lawnmower carnage, to billiard ball bashing, and boating dismemberment, The Trip isn’t afraid to dive headfirst into the darkness. It leans into delicious wickedness at every opportunity, then ups the gross-factor, and this is where it truly thrives.

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But this isn’t just some gonzo picture, with no story, no style, and no substance, this is a well-thought-out film which boasts great cinematography, a gorgeous setting, a beautiful colour palette, and a fully developed narrative. It is also a movie with a great cast.

Rapace and Hennie are excellent as the on/off lovers at the centre of the story. Their dislike for each other provides the movie with some of its earliest laughs, while their forced team-up against the convicts is what keeps things interesting as the tale progresses.

The film is essentially about their relationship and the hurdles it faces. Sure, this relationship has to go to some extreme places, but the film explores the idea that maybe this is exactly what the pair need in order to fix their problems. Of course, I won’t say whether or not violence is the answer to their marital disharmony, but I will say this kind of therapy is certainly fun to watch. The Trip is a picture which isn’t afraid to have fun with these characters, and seeing two despicable people find common ground against a greater evil makes for enjoyable stuff.

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The Trip is a devilish romp, perfect for those with a twisted sense of humour. It doesn’t pull any punches, leans into the blackest aspects of its premise, and really goes to town.

If you are after something that isn’t afraid to go to extremes, then The Trip is likely for you. Those of a nervous disposition, or who simply hate toilet humour, should probably give it a miss.

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